#J – Julius Caesar by William Shakespeare


Thanks to Dhivya Balaji, a fellow bibliophile, potterhead, and blogger, for guest writing this post on my blog. You can check her blog out here. She is a book editor as well.

Genre: Tragedy

Image result for julius caesar book

About the Book:

Written and performed in 1599, when England was going through political turmoil, this play talks about the (then and now) relevant concepts of power struggles, betrayal, misinformation, rousing political dramas and mob frenzy at the death of a beloved leader. The play is a tragedy, loosely based on Roman history. It spoke in great detail about the violence of civil strife and the requirements and necessities of leadership. Also known as The Tragedy of Julius Caesar, this play talks about what could happen if the ruling class ruled for power rather than the well-being of people.

Memories:

I cannot talk of the play without talking about my high-school education. Though I’d heard of, and even read a few of Shakespeare’s works then (the first one being The Merchant of Venice), this was special because a part of this play was the syllabus for 15-16 year old kids. I still remember the way my English Teacher handled this complex play with such finesse that for a few hours in a week we were all transported back to 17th century. Be it in her animated gestures or the way she gave additional information that was not strictly syllabus related, she made us love the play. And that made me take up the full work and read. I loved the nuances of the play thanks to the solid beginning I had.

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